Bookmark(0)

Published

20th July 2020

Knowledge Type

Data & Statistics Guidance

Organisation

, Net Zero Infrastructure Industry Association

Major Project

N/A

Of Interest To

Consultants Contractors Investors Leadership teams Operators Private sector clients Public sector clients

The scale of infrastructure change needed to meet net zero heat

Summary

A report published by the Net Zero Infrastructure Industry Coalition explores the scale of infrastructure change needed to meet net zero heat. The challenge is such that urgent action is required, but the transition to net zero heat offers tremendous opportunities and could lead to the development of completely new industries offering large scale employment and economic growth across the UK.

Written by a group of forward-thinking UK businesses and public sector organisations, The Path To Zero Carbon Heat report provides pathways for decarbonising the heating of Britain’s homes and workplaces by 2050 – responsible for 20% of the UK’s greenhouse gas footprint. It presents three possible scenarios and highlights the need for government to make early decisions about the paths to take and set supporting regulation:

  1. The electrification of heat, replacing natural gas, together with electric vehicles replacing petrol and diesel, will lead to an almost quadrupling of total electricity capacity to 400GW in 2050, up from 110GW today, including a more than five-fold increase in wind and solar generated electricity from 37GW today to 170GW in 2050.
  2. A hydrogen led scenario for heating is reliant on the rapid development and demonstration of new hydrogen technology across all aspects of the energy system within the next five years. This will then require creating and scaling of hydrogen production and transmission to produce 100GW to supply over 15 million homes plus non-domestic users. Electricity capacity needs will still more than double owing to the electrification of personal transport, to 250GW.
  3. A hybrid approach will potentially reduce the scale of new infrastructure needed but has much greater system complexity and optimisation challenges. It will still mean an almost three-fold increase in electricity capacity to 280GW by 2050, in addition to between 20GW and 30GW of hydrogen production. The hybrid approach offers the potential to reduce electricity capacity by 25% in comparison to the electrification scenario, and hydrogen capacity by at least 70% in comparison to the hydrogen scenario.

The report does not prescribe a specific route to net zero heat, but all scenarios considered present challenges. All require taking technologies such as CCS and auto-thermal reforming from pilot stage, through to readiness in the late 2020s, through to mass deployment starting in 2030 and continuing to 2050. This represents an enormous challenge in infrastructure deployment previously unseen in the UK.